Plotter, Pantser, And Paranormal Historical Fiction

See the source image

Write What You Know.” That’s not always easy when you’re writing a historical fiction piece taking place centuries ago, revolving around an indigenous people. A life I’ve never lived, people I’ve never met, and terrain I’ve never walked.

I have to say writing book one of my trilogy Twilight Ends: Keepers of the Gate, was easy given it takes place in the twenty-first century, in a place I know well, Geneva New York in a Victorian Bed and Breakfast setting near Seneca Lake. Book two will be much harder to conceive after thrusting my characters through time, into the heart of Iroquois Confederacy in the 1700s and 1800s colonial Geneva, New York and requires a different strategy.

I’m generally a pantser, letting my characters guide the story. A plotter, I am not. Outlining a book always seemed a waste of time, especially when my muse wants to stray outside the outline.

Plotter and Pantser Interweaved  

See the source image

Okay… well, what now?

Although I did not structure book one with an outline, book two requires a different strategy, a combination of pantser and plotter. I aim to explore and represent real events accurately (outlined) while injecting fictional characters and dialogues into historical situations (pantser). Having already developed my characters’ history, flaws, idiosyncrasies, strengths, weaknesses, and desires, the unfamiliar terrain of book two will be less challenging with an outline.

Thus, a dual strategy of constructing a precise outline of historical facts and weaving fictional characters through authentic 17th and 18th-century landscapes, Iroquoian lifestyles, and a devastating Revolutionary War is the plan. For several months, research and writing will consume my time. It will be a daunting but thrilling dive into another world.

See the source image

Accuracy, authenticity requires facts, lots of research.  Research? Hmm, a topic for next time.

By The Way Today Is National Watermelon Day

If you’re melting from August heat and want to cool off, watermelon is the perfect hydrating fruit. This high-nutrient, low-fat melon is rich in vitamin C, and A, dietary fiber, and antioxidants boast numerous health benefits: Decreased risk of hypertension, heart disease, osteoarthritis, and cancer.

Cool off with my icy Watermelon-Strawberry smoothie recipe below.

Frozen Watermelon Strawberry Smoothie

Ingredients

4 Servings

  • 4 cups Watermelon(frozen, diced, seedless)
  • 4 cups Strawberries (frozen)
  • 2 tbsps Lime juice
  • 6 Large Mint leaves
  • 2 tbsps Agave Nectar (honey optional)

Preparations

Place all ingredients in blender and blend until creamy.

Enjoy!

2 Thoughts

  1. I can’t imagine doing so much research before writing. I’d forget the whole thing before I even started penning my thoughts down. And if I wrote the research, it’d be like taking a quiz. Bah. I’d rather write, then go back and research specific things to fill in the blanks.
    My romantic thriller was outlined all the way save for the ending, which I outlined while drafting. It was an easy process – like following the dots. The new fantasy isn’t behaving, so it’s taking a combination of pantsing and plotting – we’re plotsers!
    My kids love watermellon! We even eat the seeds here. Well, we buy it dry and roasted with salts and seasoning, it’s very tasty!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Jina. You’ve obviously found your style of writing. I still find it too confining to use outlines but I’m going to give it a try this time. I actually love the research and learning about cultures before I put pen to paper. I guess it’s all the research I performed for my Ph.d. But your way is also good. I can’t wait to see what you’ve done with your new book. I also have the last of you trilogy waiting on my Kindle.
      Watermelon reminds me of my Southern roots when we sat on the porch and just chewed on a big chunk in the sweltering heat. 😊
      Thanks for reading my post, Jina!!

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.